RL Macklin's Sustainability & EHS Website

Integrated Strategies for Managing Sustainability & EHS

RL Macklin's Sustainability & EHS Website

Integrated Strategies for Managing Sustainability & EHS

RL Macklin's Sustainability & EHS Website

Integrated Strategies for Managing Sustainability & EHS

RL Macklin's Sustainability & EHS Website

Integrated Strategies for Managing Sustainability & EHS

Historic Tradition, New Technology and E-Waste Come Together in 2010 Winter Olympics

In a year of several firsts for Olympic medals the Royal Canadian Mint brought together traditions of Native People, modern technology  and e-waste recycling to create a set of unique medals for the 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralymics.

In honor of of the Four Host First Nations people on whose territory the Games are being held, the athlete medals were struck with compelling symbols of West Coast native art.  The Vancouver 2010 medals are based on two large master artworks of an orca whale (Olympic) and raven (Paralympic) by Corrine Hunt, a Canadian designer/artist of Komoyue and Tlingit heritage based in Vancouver, BC.

The design on each medal represents a section hand cropped from the original artwork.  In total 615 unique medals for the Olympics and 399 for the Paralymics were created.  All the metal for the medals was supplied by Teck Resources.  Teck Resources supplied 2.05 kilograms of gold, 1,950 kilograms of silver and 903 kg of copper for the medals.  A small percentage of the total  gold, silver and copper used was recovered from 6.8 metric tons of circuit boards, headed for landfill.  In total  1.52 percent of the gold, 0.122 percent of the  silver, and 1.11 percent of the copper supplied by Teck Resources came from end-of-life  circuit boards. The boards were shredded, the recoverable material separated and melted to recover the valuable material.

The undulating surface of the medals intended to evoke thoughts of the sea, snow and natural environment of British Columbia was also a first.  Production of the surface required the use of 12 separate computer cut and milled dies.  The Royal Canadian Mint has a website dedicated to telling the story of the medals creation, with more about the manufacturing processes and the artisans involved in creating the medals.

Problems stemming from e-waste are explored further in this paper; Could Your Recycling Program Lead to Charges of Greenwashing or Worse — Hidden Markets in Waste Recycling

Comments (9)

9 Responses to “Historic Tradition, New Technology and E-Waste Come Together in 2010 Winter Olympics”

  1. Very nice and informative article. Thanks for the quality content and I hope you update your blog frequently as I`m interested in this topic. I`ve already bookmarked this article. Thanx!

  2. I loved your post, it really added a great point of view on the matter. Thanks allot.

  3. John says:

    hey, nice blog…really like it and added to bookmarks. keep up with good work

  4. James says:

    hey there, this might be little offtopic, but i am hosting my site on hostgator and they will suspend my hosting in 4days, so i would like to ask you which hosting do you use or recommend?

  5. Nice intriguing article. It provides informative insights to the blog readers like me.

  6. RLM says:

    James,
    Sorry for the delayed response… WordPress thought your comment was spam. In any case I use A2Hosting.com. It is kind of a new host company. But there are two things I like about them. They provide a complimentary backup of your site and they are carbon neutral. On my website’s About This Website page (http://www.robertamacklin.com/about_roberta_macklin_website.html) I have included some info about them and a link.

  7. Samantha says:

    Informative story, bookmarked your site with interest to see more!

  8. Keep up the superb work.

  9. Excellent read, I just gave your post onto a colleague who was trying to dig up more data on this issue. I’ll ask him tomorrow if it was any use to him. Thanks.

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